Reading Rules

I’m not entirely sure why, but I seem to only want to read the rules to a game if I own it.  I understand part of my desire – I really enjoy spreading out the components and manipulating them while reading the rules.  This helps cement the abstract of the rules with the physical of the components.

This past week I amused myself by reading the rules to 1860: Railroading on the Isle of Wight, and then also for Liberté

1860 proved to be an easy read, if a long one.  18xx games have a familiar style of rules, and 1860 did not offer huge variances from the usual oscillation between stock rounds and operating rounds, and of the usual order of operations.  Nevertheless it struck me as an interesting rail game with a vibrant roster of companies, a tight map, and a potential for a very interesting game.  I liked the rules for pacing how the companies open.  Reminiscent of 1825, but perhaps a bit better.

Liberté is a game I have owned before, but one I had not played since 2004.  I did not really love my first and only prior game.  But I was able to re-acquire this game in a recent math trade, and I am interested in trying it again.  In recent years I have come around to be a Martin Wallace fan – at least some of the time.

On a different tangent, I have recently been playing in a RPG.  First time in quite a while.  We are playing Vikings invading England in the days of the Ragnar Brothers.  For amusement I have been showing my fellow players various maps from my boardgames.  The map of Britannia is nice and authoritative.  The map from Fire and Axe is nicely thematic.  And I also showed them the map from Kings and Castles which is one of the old tea towel maps from the modern-day Ragnar Brothers!

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